Category Archives: Walks

First Steps: Walking Weekend kicks off

The first group of walkers set off In bright sunshine this morning. Two more groups enjoyed guided walks later in the day and the Connecting Threads exhibition in the village hall attracted plenty of visitors (and compliments).

Walkers setting out from Beachamwell Village Hall

Walkers setting out from Beachamwell Village Hall

 

The Walking Weekend continues with a talk by Mark Cocker this evening (sold out!), and more walks and a further opportunity to visit the exhibition tomorrow.

Visitors at the Beachamwell Connecting Threads exhibition

Visitors at the Beachamwell Connecting Threads exhibition

 

Beachamwell Walking Weekend

Preparations are now well in hand to celebrate the culmination of the Connecting Threads project in Beachamwell with a Walking Weekend on 5 & 6 April 2014.

As well as a programme of walks there will also be an exhibition and displays, a presentation by naturalist Mark Cocker and the launch of a brand new footpath map of Beachamwell.

Full details of the programme are now available. Follow the ‘Walking Weekend’ link or click on www.exploringourfootpaths.co.uk/beachamwell/walking-weekend

 

 

 

 

The Unexpected

The September Wednesday Walk walk revealed the unexpected as we trod the track from Swaffham to Beachamwell:
Shouldham Lane doesn’t go to Shouldham – how did it get there?

Shouldham Lane

Shouldham Lane

No cobblers along Shoemaker’s Lane, but an allotment with a warning on the gate;
A small and beautiful barn at the out-of-the-way Town Farm;
Traditional Breckland pines at Castle Acre Bottom;

Castle Acre Bottom

Pine Row at Castle Acre Bottom

And a quiet picnic site in the depth of the forest.

picnic

Forest Picnic

Thanks to Sue for words and pictures

 

Yellow Visitor

The Wednesday Walkers were coming along Ride 105 on this month’s walk when we were very lucky to see a Clouded Yellow butterfly as it flew rapidly from one flower to another.

Clouded Yellow butterfly

Clouded Yellow butterfly

The Clouded Yellow seldom survives our cold wet winters and the ones we occasionally do see have come from Southern Europe usually after hot weather when warm winds blow from south.  Although large numbers of these butterflies do visit Britain some years, in other years none are recorded, so our sighting is an event worth recording.

The Brimstone is the only common yellow butterfly that we do see in our gardens and in the countryside, but its shape and colour is so different that it cannot be confused with the Clouded Yellow.

A Brimstone butterfly

A Brimstone butterfly

Words and Photos: Sue Pennell

Prickly Questions

Well actually there weren’t any prickles involved, but one or two of the plants we noticed on our Thursday walk were not well known to us. So I have got out the books and found the following.

The shrub with the white flowers near the bridge in Murgot’s Lane is called a Wayfaring-tree (Viburnum lantana) and is closely related to the guelder rose. The black fruits ripen in late summer and are eaten by birds, although humans find their taste unpleasant.

Wayfaring Tree

Wayfaring Tree

John Gerard, a 16th century botanist, gave the shrub its name because it was so common along the lanes of Southern England, but  I’ve never seen it elsewhere in our hedgerows.  Have you?

The feathery plant with tiny yellow flowers we noticed besides the footpath running across the fields at St John’s Farm is Flixweed (Descurainia sophia).  It is an annual and one plant can produce 700,000 seeds.  It is possibly native to Britain or a long-term introduction.  It was a common plant of waste ground in the 17th century but is now rarely found. Distribution is scattered through England and Wales. It grows on sandy soil in East Anglia and the Breckland is the centre of distribution.  It is the main larval food plant of the rare Grey Carpet Moth, a speciality of the Brecks.

Flixweed

Flixweed

And of course we didn’t need the book to recognise Dog Roses blooming in the hedgerows .  But which species did we see? – there are many different sorts!

Dog Rose

Dog Rose

Words and Photos: Sue Pennell

Large Skippers and Painted Ladies

Following Dr Sarah Spooner and Dr Jon Gregory’s visit to the Connecting Threads walk last Thursday evening, Sue and I have decided to broaden our approach to the Wednesday Walks. These are a series of monthly walks which we started in October 2012 and our aim so far has been to help people enjoy the many footpaths around our village and to introduce some of the history of these paths. For the next walk on 3 July we have decided to focus on flora and fauna.

A flower rich forest ride

A flower rich forest ride

Today we reconnoitered the route for next Wednesday’s walk. We walked in warm sunshine across fields, down ancient tracks and forest rides.  In two hours we saw over 40 different varieties of wild flower and recognized that some, like viper’s bugloss, are indicators of the old Breck landscape, thriving as they do on dry sandy soil.  In their turn the flowers attract butterflies and moths and Sue introduced me to a number of species today, including the large skipper and the painted lady.

Large Skipper on Viper's Bugloss

Large Skipper on Viper’s Bugloss

I am sure that whatever the weather on 3 July, we will enjoy another interesting and enjoyable morning and that what we discover will feed into the Connecting Threads project.

Words: Leah Spencer; Photos: Sue Pennell

Wednesday Walks take place on the first Wednesday of the month starting at Beachamwell Village Hall on The Green at 10.30am. Everyone is welcome – just turn up! The walk usually lasts about 2 hours and is quite relaxed and friendly. (Dogs on leads please.)

An Evening with the Experts

The grey and dull evening didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of our walking group on the second in our series of Thursday evening walks when they set off to explore the rights of way around Shingham in the company of Sarah Spooner and Jon Gregory from the Landscape History Department of UEA.